November 23, 2017

Go Back   FlyFishingInNH.com Forum > General > General Discussion

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #51  
Old 03-14-2014, 05:31 PM
brooktroutangler brooktroutangler is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 340
Default

Take this teeny tiny issue in a teeny tiny town and look at how arduous a task it has become to try and arrive at a consensus, let alone have any actual actions taken. There is town government involved, lawyers, private consultants, ecologists, biologists, and every other job title with a gist in it, average citizens, UNH, state government agencies and related affiliates, non-profit groups, possible Federal and or Federally related agencies, and on and on and on. Countless hours and who knows how much money studying one thing or another about this dam. I am amazed day in and day out how any town in America (and our State and Federal Government too) actually functions to get anything done. There are so many people involved with every issue, it boggles the mind how we survive. Government has grown exponentially on a massive scale. Complete paralysis by analysis.
Reply With Quote
  #52  
Old 03-15-2014, 08:50 AM
truiteman truiteman is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: On the water
Posts: 363
Default

The Whittenton Dam is the one we saw the presentation on. It is going to become a greenway inside a city. What a turn around in an old mill town. Instead of a seedy run down neighborhood there will now be open space and a place to recreate!

Well it isn't paralysis BTA but it is a long slog. I will say that as success around dam removals builds it has been easier to achieve concensus and this is a new win for the bureaucrats as it keeps them employed.

Removing dams is going to be the WPA of the 21st Century. If you don't know what WPA is you can Google it.

Steve
Reply With Quote
  #53  
Old 03-15-2014, 09:48 AM
natefish natefish is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Conway
Posts: 1,409
Send a message via AIM to natefish
Default

It is exciting to me that more and more people see the importance of dam removal. Those who balk at dam removal have a narrow minded understanding of how river ecosystems function. Hopefully the arguments over what to do with dams become less divisive as more people become educated. We need to remember that we have come a long way. We also need to remember why projects like the Atlantic Salmon restoration project did not work... If you haven't you should all watch Carter Davidson's film Turning Tail.
__________________
Hill Country Guide Service
www.whitemountainflyfishing.com
Reply With Quote
  #54  
Old 03-18-2014, 10:49 AM
Hextall Hextall is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Lee, NH
Posts: 161
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by truiteman View Post
With it being Town Meeting season, any update on this dam?
The consultant that we (Newmarket) hired to do the partial feasibility study is likely to finish their report in June. We are getting an update next thursday night on their progress.

Exeter voted to remove their dam last week, however that article was put on the ballot by citizen's petition. There really isn't such a group of folks in Newmarket to push for dam removal (at least nobody in that camp has come to our dam committee meetings). There are by far more people interested in keeping the dam in Newmarket that have been showing up to our meetings.
Reply With Quote
  #55  
Old 03-18-2014, 11:27 AM
Steve H.'s Avatar
Steve H. Steve H. is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Hampton, NH (and Eustis, ME)
Posts: 2,024
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hextall View Post
There are by far more people interested in keeping the dam in Newmarket that have been showing up to our meetings.
I found the same situation years ago when I spoke (on behalf of GBTU) at a similar meeting for the removal of the Oyster River dam in Durham. We in TU had a small presence but most people wanted to keep the dam, quite vociferously, in fact. One little old lady actually yelled at me after my speech.
__________________
It is a plain fact, however, that downstream fishing with a non-imitative fly (lure, in the British sense) does not mix comfortably with upstream imitative fishing...I'll stay out of the argument about whether this technique is really fly fishing. In terms of interest, it is for me ahead of most downstream fishing and spinning. And I've already opined that spinning is better than staying at home with the television set.

Datus Proper, "What The Trout Said"
Reply With Quote
  #56  
Old 03-19-2014, 08:47 AM
truiteman truiteman is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: On the water
Posts: 363
Default

Hi Hextall!

If you need some help with doing a greenway presentation let me know.

I can get a copy of the presentation I saw and send it to you.

Also if you need some testimony, I would try and make myself available.

Education is the key to overcoming the fear of change.

Once folks see a beautiful green forest along a free flowing river they forget about the mosquito infested foul smelling pond in a hurry.

Steve

PS: That Oyster River Dam put fishery restoration back 200 years. The people who wanted the dam will be the first ones complaining when the fish stocks die from lack of forage.

PPS: And as an editorial comment - shame on the world reknown UNH Marine Fisheries Department for letting any of these dams be rebuilt. They know the score yet, as far as I know, remain mysteriously quiet.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
fishing, fly fishing, new hampshire, three rivers

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:49 AM.



Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions Inc.