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Old 06-05-2016, 06:31 PM
bridgeman bridgeman is offline
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Default Fishing gloves?

I'm heading back to Alaska for Coho's in a few months and need advice. My hands took a serious beating last year. A hundred big fish a day will test your gear and your body in ways that you are not prepared for. One problem was the numerous cuts from leaders and fish teeth and out of control reel handles. I know nobody's feeling sorry for me here but l need suggestions for protective gloves. A few expericed guys used golf gloves but they didn't seem quite right for the task. Your hands are wet for 8 hours a day from handling fish and the rain. That adds to the problem by keeping your hands soft and susceptible to nicks and cuts. I have neoprene but I think they would be way too warm for this work. Any sugestions?
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Old 06-06-2016, 06:34 AM
Chris_NH Chris_NH is offline
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Think I might go for a loose fitting pair of golf rain gloves. It's a different material that regular golf gloves and they usually come in pairs unlike regular golf gloves. Anything thicker, like neoprene, you'd lose too much feel I think.
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Old 06-06-2016, 08:12 AM
AKR28 AKR28 is offline
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Default Fishing Glove Idea

Pricey but might be ideal a company called KAST makes some really neat fishing gloves.

kastgear.com

Good luck and yes we are all jealous

Kent in Bedford
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  #4  
Old 06-07-2016, 11:43 AM
reelstory reelstory is offline
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Default Buff Fishing Gloves

Google it. $30 +.
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  #5  
Old 09-27-2016, 05:29 PM
Cree Cree is offline
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You shouldn't use any gloves

It removes the healthy slime from the fish

Google it. It can have long lasting ill effects
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  #6  
Old 09-29-2016, 11:30 AM
BrookieSlayah BrookieSlayah is offline
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Using gloves is a lot better than dropping the fish and having them band around on the ground. When you are in a high volume of fish (like as a biologist hatchery worker) area, gloves certainly aren't great but they are better than nothing.
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Old 09-29-2016, 05:14 PM
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blindskate blindskate is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AKR28 View Post
Pricey but might be ideal a company called KAST makes some really neat fishing gloves.

kastgear.com

Good luck and yes we are all jealous

Kent in Bedford
Those Steelhead ones look nice. I think I'll end up getting a pair. It's nice to strip with gloves on, I almost always take them off after I net the fish. If i can slip a hand warmer in there, even better.
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Old 10-06-2016, 06:38 AM
bridgeman bridgeman is offline
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Default Read the op!

The gloves are to protect my hands from getting beat up from a week of fishing for large powerful fish. Unless you have done it you no idea how your body and gear is tested in a week of casting and catching hundreds of fish up to 20 pounds. These fish will all be dead in a few weeks regardless of how you land them so that is not a consideration with reasonable care.
The answer was baseball batting gloves on clearance at Wallmart. They were just the right combination of protection and feel to get the job done. At $7 a pair, I bought two pair to have a back up.
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Last edited by bridgeman; 10-06-2016 at 06:43 AM.
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  #9  
Old 10-07-2016, 08:01 PM
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overmywaders overmywaders is offline
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I know that some Alaskan river regs, e.g., the Kenai Penn., require a fisherman to keep any Coho salmon over 16" lifted from the water. Didn't you hit your bag limit of three pretty quickly? Perhaps you were in a different area, under different regs.
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