December 17, 2017

Go Back   FlyFishingInNH.com Forum > General > Gear Discussion

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 08-26-2012, 10:41 AM
Bamboo Bryan Bamboo Bryan is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Seacoast Area
Posts: 199
Default Beulah Blue Water Rod

Hey gang,

I'm posing yet another gear question to you guys. I've almost all but decided to pull the trigger on purchasing a new Beulah Blue Water 8/9 wt rod. I've had two different guides recommend them and I've only been able to find good reviews online. I'm upgrading so that I have a faster stouter rod for launching casts into orbit for strippers and turning over massive pike flies this fall.

My question is do any of you have experience with the Blue Waters? they come in 7/8, 8/9, 10/11, and 13/15 wt. I'm looking specifically for an extremely fast action rod (I need to keep up with Connor on these stripper excursions, he's launching 80+' casts every time as compared to my 65+' and it is obviously the rod and not my lack of skill)

I'd love to hear your input on this! Thanks!
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 08-26-2012, 03:12 PM
ConnorR's Avatar
ConnorR ConnorR is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Dover, NH
Posts: 971
Default

Bryan, I told you not to tell anyone about our stripper excursions. But, you are right, my pole does get me more strippers.





Couldn't resist.
__________________
"When a fish is caught on bait, I feel bad for it being so gullible, unable to resist - often gut-hooked. When a fish is caught on a lure, I sometimes feel it's been abused especially if there are barbed galvanized treble hooks or umbrella rigs involved. But when I catch a big, smart striper (or a native steelhead, or a double-digit bonefish, or a remote lagoon tarpon, or....) on a self-tied fly, I feel that neither of us have any shame when we look eye to eye." -Juro
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 08-26-2012, 04:10 PM
mirrorlakedave's Avatar
mirrorlakedave mirrorlakedave is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Mirror Lake, NH
Posts: 629
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ConnorR View Post
my pole does get me more strippers.

Couldn't resist.
Sounds like someone is doing a little bragging. And where are you guys getting the "STRIPPERS"?
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 08-26-2012, 04:29 PM
Bamboo Bryan Bamboo Bryan is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Seacoast Area
Posts: 199
Default

HAHAHAHA jokes on me! I totally didn't even catch that when I reviewed my post. Thanks for calling me out on such a prime mistake Connor.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 08-26-2012, 08:25 PM
wet_fly_action's Avatar
wet_fly_action wet_fly_action is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Quincy, MA
Posts: 1,099
Default

A faster rod won't turn over bigger flies.
It's the weight of the line that turns a fly over. If you're trying to turn over huge flies think higher line weight not faster rod.
As far as your casting, are you using a shooting taper (like Teeny) line? If not get one. Are you using a stripping basket? If not get one.
Usually the problem with long casts in saltwater situations is keeping the running line from tangling, not a lack of power or distance.
No offense intended, but If you can't make 70+ foot casts with a 9wt you have some casting issues that need to be addressed, and a faster rod will makes things that much harder, not easier.
__________________
How good to be here, in the green, dark, cool, mountains, near a ruddy camp fire, with the loneliness and beauty of nature at hand, and in my ears the music of a murmuring stream!
-Zane Grey
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 08-26-2012, 08:36 PM
Solid's Avatar
Solid Solid is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Manchester, NH
Posts: 1,536
Send a message via AIM to Solid
Default

wet_fly is dead on.

What are you using for gear now? Maybe we can help you make that work instead of buying new stuff.

As for the Beulah rods, they have a strange grip that some people love, and others not so much. I would suggest checking it out in person before buying one.
__________________
"Accept fun. Put on some music. Dance with your vacuum. If accomplishing chores, abnormally concrete ones, consistently try to accumulate your affection and activity up!" - annawilliam
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 08-26-2012, 09:43 PM
Bamboo Bryan Bamboo Bryan is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Seacoast Area
Posts: 199
Default

I agree with you guys. Currently I'm using a very old 8 wt Orvis rod that was purchased in one of those little plastic boxes without any warranty (my dad got it for me when I was 15 intending only for it to be a junk around large smallmouth rod in the Ohio river). I'm frustrated with how deeply the rod is flexing with only a 300 grain Rio Striper (not stripper!) line which makes me nervous for putting a heavier shooting line on it. It feels almost like my full flex 5 wt when I'm casting, just not as friendly on the arm as the 5 wt. It also has 2 bent eyes (I know this is an easy fix, its just an annoyance). I also love the spare tip that comes with the rod.

I also want something a little more stout for saltwater fish and pike/musky which is stiffer and I actually really like that handle design (for figure 8-ing pike and musky at the boat)

In general I just think I want to upgrade my arsenal now that I'm fishing at least once or twice a week in the salt.

edit* I do have a stripping basket, I forgot to mention that.

What do you guys think? I value the communities input!

Last edited by Bamboo Bryan; 08-26-2012 at 09:46 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 08-26-2012, 10:06 PM
ConnorR's Avatar
ConnorR ConnorR is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Dover, NH
Posts: 971
Default

That striper line is a shooting head. But just watching that rod flex, you would need to drastically change your casting style to be able to throw such a slow rod. Get the 8/9, or even 10/11 if you want to throw that huge Pollock fly easily, and a 350-400gr shooting head. Keep the 8 for schoolies. Oh, and throw a tight loop.

Edit: The more I think about it, the more I'm leaning 10-11. With a 450g grain line, you'd get to the big fish fast.
__________________
"When a fish is caught on bait, I feel bad for it being so gullible, unable to resist - often gut-hooked. When a fish is caught on a lure, I sometimes feel it's been abused especially if there are barbed galvanized treble hooks or umbrella rigs involved. But when I catch a big, smart striper (or a native steelhead, or a double-digit bonefish, or a remote lagoon tarpon, or....) on a self-tied fly, I feel that neither of us have any shame when we look eye to eye." -Juro

Last edited by ConnorR; 08-26-2012 at 10:12 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 08-26-2012, 10:57 PM
Bamboo Bryan Bamboo Bryan is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Seacoast Area
Posts: 199
Default

My original thoughts were of the 10/11 wt (Musky Country Outfitters recommended that model in order to turn over the rabbit, I mean flies that they throw to muskies) so that I could fish for big musky and maybe someday tarpon, but if I got the 10/11 wt I'd have to buy new line(s), and a reel with extra spools. I just don't realistically have the money to make such a big investment. the 10/11 wt will just have to stay on the wish list I'm afraid
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 08-26-2012, 11:39 PM
wet_fly_action's Avatar
wet_fly_action wet_fly_action is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Quincy, MA
Posts: 1,099
Default

Please take a look at this: http://www.flyfishingforum.com/exper...ineratings.htm
450 grains is off the chart. That is what, a 15wt? Lines like that are for marlin fishing.
Weight is weight. Whether you call it a 9wt or 240 grains it's all the same to your rod. The solution to gaining distance is not adding more and more weight. Picture a trampoline. Now drop a golf ball onto it. Next a baseball, next a basketball. Each will bounce higher than the smaller object. However at some point it will start to go the other direction. Drop too heavy an object on the trampoline and it will bounce lower and lower, and shake and gyrate disturbingly.
You will notice the same thing with a fly rod. You will be able to cast further and further with heavier line weights up to a point. Then casts will become more and more difficult to control until you cannot cast at all.
The exact same principles apply to any type of rod. The secret to distance casting with a spinning rod isn't trying to cast 1 oz. sinkers on an ultralight!
That 300 grain line would be perfect on a 10wt. Or pick up a 200-250 for the 8wt you have. I have no problem casting 90 feet with my Fenwick and 225 grains.
__________________
How good to be here, in the green, dark, cool, mountains, near a ruddy camp fire, with the loneliness and beauty of nature at hand, and in my ears the music of a murmuring stream!
-Zane Grey
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:21 AM.



Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions Inc.