November 22, 2017

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Old 04-12-2017, 08:22 AM
O.Mykiss O.Mykiss is offline
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Default Collapse Of The Historic New England Cod Fishery In ‘Sacred Cod’

For all you Salter’s
SACRED COD, premiering Thursday, April 13, at 9PM ET/PT on Discovery, chronicles the collapse of America’s oldest fishery. Scientists and environmental advocates have attributed the decline to overfishing, climate change, and government mismanagement. Many of the fishermen — who are losing their livelihoods and way of life as the species has declined — have argued that the science is wrong and have protested the government’s ban. The film features interviews with fishermen and their families, along with scientists, advocates, and federal officials who warn that the plight of cod could be a harbinger for fish around the world as the planet warms and overfishing persists. The illuminating documentary tells a complex story that shows how one of the greatest fisheries on the planet has been driven to the edge of commercial extinction, while providing suggestions about how consumers can help support sustainable fisheries. It also shows how climate change is no longer a distant threat and is now having a very real impact on everything from fish to fishermen.
https://corporate.discovery.com/discovery-newsroom/discovery-explores-the-complex-collapse-of-the-historic-new-england-cod-fishery-in-sacred-cod/
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Old 04-12-2017, 10:28 AM
bobo bobo is offline
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Thanks. Very intersting. Sounds like a must see.
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Old 04-22-2017, 07:20 PM
Chris_NH Chris_NH is offline
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I'm skeptical of just about any conclusion that points to overfishing or overhunting being the primary reason for decline of many fish and game animals. As fisherman and hunters we're the only thing that's able to be regulated by those claiming the right to regulate us. They can't control the climate, so let's "control" the anglers and hunters, who have a tiny effect on the overall situation.

Ticks (that thrive in mild winters) hammer the moose, so overhunting is the "problem", and permits go way down because that's what can be regulated. The climate hammers the cod, so overfishing is the "problem". It's like the deer issue in the North country... We went more than 20 years without rifle doe days because the deer population needed to improve. Turned out it was the winterkill that made the real difference (obviously, but they can't "regulate" the winters, so...). Now we've finally got a doe day again... At least until the next group feels they can save the herd by stopping the working man from killing a few dozen does.

Climate changes, and so do game and fish numbers... There was an ice age and a warming, long before man had fossil fuel burning motors. Bottom line... Quit blaming the hunters and fishermen for the natural variations in game and fish numbers, and quit messing with the livelihoods of lots of good people who know the fishery and have a vested interest in it's long term sustainability.
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Old 04-22-2017, 10:48 PM
BrookieSlayah BrookieSlayah is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris_NH View Post
I'm skeptical of just about any conclusion that points to overfishing or overhunting being the primary reason for decline of many fish and game animals. As fisherman and hunters we're the only thing that's able to be regulated by those claiming the right to regulate us. They can't control the climate, so let's "control" the anglers and hunters, who have a tiny effect on the overall situation.

Ticks (that thrive in mild winters) hammer the moose, so overhunting is the "problem", and permits go way down because that's what can be regulated. The climate hammers the cod, so overfishing is the "problem". It's like the deer issue in the North country... We went more than 20 years without rifle doe days because the deer population needed to improve. Turned out it was the winterkill that made the real difference (obviously, but they can't "regulate" the winters, so...). Now we've finally got a doe day again... At least until the next group feels they can save the herd by stopping the working man from killing a few dozen does.

Climate changes, and so do game and fish numbers... There was an ice age and a warming, long before man had fossil fuel burning motors. Bottom line... Quit blaming the hunters and fishermen for the natural variations in game and fish numbers, and quit messing with the livelihoods of lots of good people who know the fishery and have a vested interest in it's long term sustainability.
I definitely see your point and even if overfishing or overhunting isn't the main cause of the collapse, I think biologists make closings necessary because it is an attempt to take away one of the variables from an equation.
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Old 04-24-2017, 02:39 AM
TGIF TGIF is offline
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For our salt water game fish and table fish, I wouldn't say that over fishing of them specifically is to blame. However, the trawlers that fish oil companies employ to catch hundreds tons of bait fish, are a real issue.
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