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  #31  
Old 10-20-2013, 07:22 PM
natefish natefish is offline
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Are there any scientific studies that point to long term negative environmental impacts of removing dams?

Dam removal will change ecosystems, however dam removal has been proven to bring back historic runs of native species. We must tolerate short term changes to achieve long term environmental restoration. There is a good reason why there are grants to fund dam removals. This is due to the fact that dam removal has been proven to positively benefit ecosystems. The communities of the great bay area will benefit greatly from an expanded saltwater fishery.

Will freshwater fishing for bass and other invasive species deteriorate? Yes...but they will be replaced by species that historically existed here.
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  #32  
Old 10-21-2013, 07:46 AM
truiteman truiteman is offline
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Until the Winnicut gets special regulations I can't comment.



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  #33  
Old 10-21-2013, 08:33 AM
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Banks10 Banks10 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by johnep View Post
taking the dam is a bad idea,
For who? Why is it a bad idea? Please enlighten myself and others what is positive about keeping it.
Is it because it displays a pretty waterfall in downtown Newmarket? Um,there's plenty of natural ones in NH.
Or because it creates an impoundment to kayak and swim? Hmm, is there a shortage of lakes and ponds around?
Maybe because other species will inhabit the ecosystem? Right, we wouldn't want natural species in the ecosystem.
Or, my favorite, the dam has "historic" value. Because the thousands of years of the Lamprey without a dam in Newmarket isn't as historic as the couple hundred of its existance.

So John, since you're part of the "90%" of people who don't want the dam gone, make an argument as to why. I'd really like to understand why.
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  #34  
Old 10-21-2013, 09:29 AM
Hextall Hextall is offline
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Originally Posted by Banks10 View Post
For who? Why is it a bad idea?
John is possibly a little biased about the benefits of the dam... he owns property and lives in a development that is on the banks of the impoundment. He potentially could lose property value and immediately accessible recreational activities.
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  #35  
Old 10-21-2013, 09:55 AM
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Banks10 Banks10 is offline
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Originally Posted by Hextall View Post
John is possibly a little biased about the benefits of the dam... he owns property and lives in a development that is on the banks of the impoundment. He potentially could lose property value and immediately accessible recreational activities.
And that's completely understandable. Obviously, this decision affects him more than most. I do understand wanting to keep the dam if ones property value could be affected. But coming on this forum and saying that removing a dam is going to be bad for a fishery is hilarious.
That said, it does suck for someone to potentially lose property value. If the dam is removed, I hope that it is as minimal as possible. Who knows, maybe Newmarket will be the center of a world class salter and striper fishery and will be a huge boon to the local economy.
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  #36  
Old 10-21-2013, 10:03 AM
johnep johnep is offline
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Default Macallen Dam

Banks, I like to listen to everyone's opinion...what is the chance of lamprey eels working their way back up in the lamprey? We feel there are a lot of unknows. What is your opinion? Thank you, John
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  #37  
Old 10-21-2013, 10:22 AM
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Banks10 Banks10 is offline
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Originally Posted by johnep View Post
Banks, I like to listen to everyone's opinion...what is the chance of lamprey eels working their way back up in the lamprey? We feel there are a lot of unknows. What is your opinion? Thank you, John
As far as I know, they do move in the river currently, just in small numbers. Removing the dam would obviously make it easier and perhaps increase the migratory/spawning numbers. Historical runs of lamprey would put a huge about of biomass into our rivers which would benefit other fish species and the insects that they eat.
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  #38  
Old 10-21-2013, 10:57 AM
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Steve H. Steve H. is offline
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Originally Posted by johnep View Post
How is the fishery on the Winnicut River after the dam was removed?
What "fishery" is this? Are you referring to the pool between the Rt 33 bridge and the dam? I know F&G dumped a bunch of fish there every spring, but it's certainly not something I'd refer to as a "fishery." My understanding is that F&G now stocks elsewhere in the Winnicut to continue providing an opportunity for stocked trout in that river.
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  #39  
Old 10-21-2013, 11:10 AM
Hextall Hextall is offline
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Any returning adult sea lamprey is in the Lamprey R. for spawning, and would not be eating other fish in the river. That's not how they work.

Obviously there would some population dynamics at play... increasing sea lamprey populations on the seacoast could potentially impact populations of game fish like stripers when they return to sea. However, increasing the sea lamprey spawning habitat also opens up spawning habitat for striper food like various herring species and alewifes, which would be the primary goal of dam removal. Lamprey eel predation is a red herring (booooo... bad pun).

Unfortunately, all the pros and cons that would be important to us fisherfolk are going to pale compared to the financial implications. Specifically, how can dam saving advocates convince their fellow residents to pay for dam repair and modifications when in all likelihood it'll be less expensive for the resident to remove the dam due to various funding avenues and grants for dam removal. There isn't a strong push in town to remove the dam, but historically Newmarket has been very cost conscious (i.e. cheap) and focused on the short term (i.e. shortsighted).

There is a lot of local talk of using the dam to generate electricity that could be used and or sold, but that has been looked at before and abandoned (last time in 1999, I believe). Installing a hydroelectric powerplant could pay for itself after about 20 years (a UNH student did an honors thesis on this, click for thesis), but this didn't include the up to $5m in modifications the dam would have to undergo to pass a 100-year flood (the student's cost analysis was based on the specs in the 1999 FERC initial permit filing... prior to DES's letter of deficiency).

Again, the DES, NOAA and F&G have all said they've not been involved in a potential dam removal project where there was so much infrastructure and recreational use of the impoundment. Removing the Macallen dam is a very long shot.
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  #40  
Old 10-21-2013, 11:16 AM
Hextall Hextall is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by natefish View Post
Are there any scientific studies that point to long term negative environmental impacts of removing dams?
Not that they don't exist, but I looked, but I couldn't find any.
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