August 4, 2020

Go Back   FlyFishingInNH.com Forum > Conservation Section > Conservation Issues

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 05-27-2008, 11:53 AM
dan hall dan hall is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 14
Default My steps to disinfect didymo

Sorry for all the posts ... can you tell i'm upset 'bout this problem
These are the steps I'm going to follow based upon the previous data shared. Hope this helps someone.

Come to find out didymo is easy to kill. From looking at the previous post sites I come away with the following thoughts;
• Treat every fresh water body as if it has didymo. So I need to disinfect each time I go to a different body of water and at the end of day.
• Eliminate absorptive items. Felt soled wading boots take an excessive amount of effort to disinfect. Use my hard-rubber soled wading boots only and save the felt soled for wading in the saltwater. How many times have you lost flies from your sheep patch? I throw mine away and pinned a piece of ripple foam from an old fly box.
• Reduce hard to clean/soak areas. I have breathable waders with built-in gravel guards. With prior waders w/o this guard I’ve forgotten to bring wrap-around guards so went wading without any. Hmm worked fine. So I cut those built-in gravel guards off!
• If possible try to stay in one body of water
• If possible try to fish from upper-most stretches of a water fishing downstream.
• Reduce the amount of items you get wet, this will reduce the amount to disinfect. Can’t count how many time I waded up to my arm-pits getting my fly-vest/boxes all wet….no more. Hope I can remember to roll-up my sleeves before reaching down for that hung-up fly..

Here’s my chosen disinfect process (5% solution of Palmolive or NapiSan soak for at least 1 minute). I did a dry-run of this in the yard. Below is my field process with some lame attempts at humor … Items needed, 5 gallon bucket with lid, plastic trash bag, Palmolive or NapiSan with ‘measuring’ device.
• Done with fishing this body of water time time to disinfect. Hmm blackflies are swarming lite-up that cigar…
• Grab my 5gallon bucket. It has a sharpie pen level mark at 3 gallons (12qts). Go back to the water and fill it up to that level being careful NOT to get any algae or other debris.
• Back at car make up my 5% solution (by volume). Hmm area figured for that amount I need about 0.6 qt or ~2.4 cups. That’s about 20oz and my container of Palmolive is 25 fl oz. Guess I pour the entire container of dishwashing soap into the 3 gallons .. makes it easy (Note to self, pick-up a replacement container for back home else wife may have nutty, trump card if forget tell her it beats putting my boots in the freezer).
• Grab a stick. Stir the concoction till well mixed.
• Okay itemize the contaminated pieces then act. Clip my fly off and attach to ripple foam. Hawk that baby in bucket ….hmm it floats. Take off my reel, grab the foam and sink it with the reel. Bingo.
• Take fly rod and put handle/reel seat into bucket. Base of tip section too ferrule first.
• Take off my wading boots and waders. Wow I wished I didn’t wait so long to pee… Put other shoes on. Take patch/reel/rod out of bucket. Take my hand and rub solution on remainder of rod. Place patch/reel/rod in trunk.
• For my bucket both boots can be submerged completed at the same time. Lightly clack them together w/o getting any water/crap on you. Put boots in bucket holding them down for at least 2 minutes. Make sure laces are saturated and move them around somewhat. After 2, take them out and put them aside (Note to self where did I put them, don’t leave them behind…)
• Take the waders. Hmm mine have neoprene booties how to handle this? I put them both in the bucket and worked the booties trying to get solution saturated into the entire ~3-5mm thickness. Ring-it, squeeze-it like a sponge. After about a minute of this take your boots and place it on the booties to completely cover all neoprene material to just above. Let set for 5 minutes.
• Lastly work your waders down into solution. Take boots out. Since these waders don’t leak I don’t need to soak the insides. Work the waders down into solution depending upon how far its contaminated. Once there hold all parts of wader submerged for 2 minutes.
• Take them out and either hand up to dry or aside.
• Put lid on bucket as this solution can be used for the entire day. Place in plastic bag along with the waders and boots.
• Make sure I didn’t leave anything behind.

Bonus the cigar is still going after all this and I don’t smell fishy … not that I usually catch anything. So going forward to pack for my next fishing trip all those items get replenished and put in the bucket and capped with lid, my ‘death to didymo’ kit.

Concerns:
• I think the weakest link here is the neoprene booties. In the readings on felt soled booties the goal is to get complete saturation into entire felt, a difficult-time consuming task. I hope the above is entirely soaking through the neoprene?
• Is all Palmolive products as effective?
• I ordered (online) some NapiSan as I like the idea of a know chemical composition. Seems nappy’s are a NZ term for cloth diapers and could not find this product here in NH. Not sure if OxyClean is same …
• Is using (potentially contaminated) stream water okay?
__________________
DanH
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 05-27-2008, 12:13 PM
lowwall's Avatar
lowwall lowwall is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 2,325
Default 409

I have read that 5 min soak in a 50% solution of Formula 409/Water is the best way , and to loose the Felt soles.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 05-27-2008, 02:07 PM
Cadoda's Avatar
Cadoda Cadoda is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Manchester
Posts: 310
Default

I have a question about wading boots: Do the rubber soled boots grip well? I've grown to love my felt soles, although they are falling apart and I should buy some new ones. What if I left them soaking in the solution between fishing spots? Just a thought.
I like the idea of leaving a bucket in the back of the car. I'm planning to start doing that after reading your post. Have there been anymore confirmed sightings of didymo in NH this year?
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 05-27-2008, 02:34 PM
Banks10's Avatar
Banks10 Banks10 is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Manchester
Posts: 594
Default

The rubbermade buckets are great. They come with a lid and you can soak your stuff while you're driving and not have to worry about the water/soap sloshing around and getting your car wet because the lid seals it all up nicely.

This junk is serious and I know most of us have watched the videos and seen the pictures. We can/should all do everything possible to slow the spread down, but in my opinion it is only a matter of time before this crap is everywhere. Hopefully I am wrong and hopefully they'll find a way to erradicate it. Maybe I'm just seeing the glass half full.
Depressing issue though.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 05-27-2008, 02:44 PM
Cadoda's Avatar
Cadoda Cadoda is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Manchester
Posts: 310
Default

Should you use another bucket of fresh water to rinse the soap off? I like the rubermaid bucket idea. I have lots of those sitting in my basement.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 05-28-2008, 02:48 PM
dan hall dan hall is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 14
Default

Hi All,
Iowwall yeah felt sole waders are evil unless you have the time to soak (2days), freeze or heat. By chance is what you read a online source on using 409? If so can you post it so we can all check into it? I see that 409 is fairly cheap and readily available.

To Cadoda's question i have aqua-stealth and don't find them to have as good traction as felt. Maybe another brand or ones will built-in studs but not absorbtive. The NZ didymo biohazard report indicates they really think FELT SOLES are one of the main vehicles to SPREAD didymo. I leave the solution on my gear but you can certainly wash it all off once you get home (facet?). I'm going to soak each time before going to another body of water then when done fishing for the day, since all waters are suspect.

Good thought on rubber-mades. One of the reasons i picked dishwashing soap is that even if the fumes leak out of lidded container fumes can't be as bad as bleach .... or my cigar ..
__________________
DanH
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 05-28-2008, 03:49 PM
OTF's Avatar
OTF OTF is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Epping NH
Posts: 279
Default

I pulled this off a New Zealand gov. website detailing recent research into the matter. Good info here;
http://www.biosecurity.govt.nz/pest-...echnical#takak

"Absorbent items required longer soaking times to allow thorough saturation. Decontamination solutions containing surfactants (nappy cleaner, dishwashing liquid) saturated absorbent items faster than decontamination solutions which did not contain surfactants. Full strength sea water required four hours treatment time for 100% mortality. Dilute seawater and dilute bleach were not effective even after long soaks. Cleaning products marked as “Environmentally Friendly” were less effective at killing didymo than commonly available dishwashing detergents.

Options were provided for using extreme temperatures to decontaminate gear where practical. The temperature for hot tap water was recommended to be no less than 45 °C, with soaking times of at least 20 minutes for non-absorbent items or at least 20 minutes plus whatever additional time is required for thorough saturation of absorbent items. Domestic water heating cylinders often deliver water to outlet taps at between 45 and 55 °C, but this may vary, so those wishing to use hot water treatment to decontaminate gear should check the temperature at the beginning and end of the treatment to ensure that it remains at no less than 45 °C. Previous recommendations for using very hot water for rapid treatment (at least 60 °C for at least one minute) still apply where practical for temperature resilient items and where temperature compliance is assured.

Combining the power of heat with the power of detergent was highly recommended for decontaminating felt-soled waders due to the inability of decontamination solutions at ambient temperatures to passively soak quickly into felt soles. The entire felt sole needs to be completely immersed for at least 30 minutes in hot tap water at no less than 45 °C (uncomfortably hot to touch) containing 5% dishwashing liquid or nappy cleaner. If hot water alone is used, careful attention is needed to ensure the temperature of the water is maintained at no less than 45 °C for 40 minutes to ensure the interior of the felt reaches a sufficient temperature. Alternatively, freezing any item until solid will also kill didymo."
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 05-29-2008, 08:03 AM
dan hall dan hall is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 14
Default

Hi OTF. Yes there is good data at that trusted site. I found to understand my fishing needs/style first, then use the cleansing data in this report to determine the easiest means to disinfect, works well.

Most likely for all of us the chosen method has to be easy, 100% effective, and fast to do. As you point out, in general if you don't use absorbent items this goal is easier to obtain as didymo is easy to kill for wading anglers say that don't use felt-soles.

Yeah i agree with you Banks10 to a degree. If collectivly we can come up with a easy means to clean, then promote the "check, clean, dry" across the states and recreational users group we should be able to 'reduce' the spread. BTW i am posting this same thread on a Maine site and have started contacting paddlers in NH (NHAMCPaddlers).

May want to start trapping beaver as well
__________________
DanH
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 05-29-2008, 07:14 PM
RichShady603 RichShady603 is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Manchester N.H.
Posts: 763
Default

Thanks Dan great posts..
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 02:52 AM.



Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions Inc.